Michael M. Haglund, MD, PhD

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Professor of Surgery
Professor of Neurobiology
Department / Division:
Surgery / Neurosurgery
Address:
DUMC 3807
Durham, NC 27710
Appointment Telephone:
919-681-1684
Office Telephone:
919-684-6936
Fax:
919-681-6566
Training:
  • MD, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1987
Residency:
  • Neurosurgery, University of Washington Hospitals, 1987-1994
Fellowship:
  • Epilepsy Surgery, Senior Fellow, University of Washington Hospitals, 1995
Other Training:
  • PhD, Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, 1988
Clinical Interests:
Epilepsy surgery, cervical spine disease, herniated discs of cervical and lumbar spine, minimally invasive surgery, global health, brain mapping
Research Interests:
Clinically, my areas of subspecialty in Neurosurgery include: the surgical treatment of epilepsy and functional mapping for resection of brain tumors. The major areas of research that have developed from this include: the cortical organization of higher cognitive functions as well as the mechanisms and pathways underlying the propagation of seizure activity. Research into the cortical organization of higher cognitive functions include: language organization, memory and face processing involving electrical stimulation mapping in patients undergoing awake craniotomies and the use of optical imaging to localize areas of the neocortex serving specific cognitive processes. The mechanisms underlying the pathways and propagation of seizures involves using two models. The in vivo model, primate visual cortex, provides access to understanding the functional organization of the primate visual cortex and how seizure activity spreads through these known pathways. The pathways are investigated using microelectrode recordings as well as optical imaging. The second model, an in vitro slice preparation, involves using both rat and human neocortical slices. Propagation of seizure activity through normal pathways is studied using intracellular and extracellular electrode recording which is combined with optical imaging of the normal activity and abnormal seizure activity propagation. By better understanding how the normal cortex in humans is organized and how abnormal activity such as seizures is propagated, improvements in the surgical treatment of epilepsy will be accomplished. Other areas of interests include the use of dynamic optical imaging to study the grading and localization of intrinsic brain tumors. As one of the authors on two U.S. patents which involves this technique, the ability to study brain tumors and other tumors not involving the brain using optical imaging may improve our ability to obtain more complete resections and to noninvasively screen and monitor many types of tumors.
Representative Publications:
  • Haglund, MM; Meno, JR; Hochman, DW; Ngai, AC; Winn, HR. Correlation of intrinsic optical signal, cerebral blood flow, and evoked potentials during activation of rat somatosensory cortex. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2008;109:654-663.  Abstract
  • Haglund, MM; Hochman, DW. Imaging of intrinsic optical signals in primate cortex during epileptiform activity. Epilepsia. 2007;48 Suppl 4:65-74.  Abstract
  • Haglund, MM; Hochman, DW. Furosemide and mannitol suppression of epileptic activity in the human brain. Journal of Neurophysiology. 2005;94:907-918.  Abstract
  • Haglund, MM; Hochman, DW. Optical imaging of epileptiform activity in human neocortex. Epilepsia. 2004;45 Suppl 4:43-47.  Abstract
  • Borel, CO; McKee, A; Parra, A; Haglund, MM; Solan, A; Prabhakar, V; Sheng, H; Warner, DS; Niklason, L. Possible role for vascular cell proliferation in cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stroke. 2003;34:427-433.  Abstract
  • Cerne, R; Haglund, MM. Electrophysiological correlates to the intrinsic optical signal in the rat neocortical slice. Neuroscience Letters. 2002;317:147-150.  Abstract
  • Muñana, KR; Vitek, SM; Tarver, WB; Saito, M; Skeen, TM; Sharp, NJ; Olby, NJ; Haglund, MM. Use of vagal nerve stimulation as a treatment for refractory epilepsy in dogs. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2002;221:977-983.  Abstract
  • Quinn, JA; Pluda, J; Dolan, ME; Delaney, S; Kaplan, R; Rich, JN; Friedman, AH; Reardon, DA; Sampson, JH; Colvin, OM; Haglund, MM; Pegg, AE; Moschel, RC; McLendon, RE; Provenzale, JM; Gururangan, S; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Herndon, JE; Bigner, DD; Friedman, HS. Phase II trial of carmustine plus O(6)-benzylguanine for patients with nitrosourea-resistant recurrent or progressive malignant glioma. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2002;20:2277-2283.  Abstract
  • Friedman, HS; Pluda, J; Quinn, JA; Ewesuedo, RB; Long, L; Friedman, AH; Cokgor, I; Colvin, OM; Haglund, MM; Ashley, DM; Rich, JN; Sampson, J; Pegg, AE; Moschel, RC; McLendon, RE; Provenzale, JM; Stewart, ES; Tourt-Uhlig, S; Garcia-Turner, AM; Herndon, JE; Bigner, DD; Dolan, ME. Phase I trial of carmustine plus O6-benzylguanine for patients with recurrent or progressive malignant glioma. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2000;18:3522-3528.  Abstract
  • Macknik, SL; Martinez-Conde, S; Haglund, MM. The role of spatiotemporal edges in visibility and visual masking. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA. 2000;97:7556-7560.  Abstract
  • McKhann, GM; Schoenfeld-McNeill, J; Born, DE; Haglund, MM; Ojemann, GA. Intraoperative hippocampal electrocorticography to predict the extent of hippocampal resection in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2000;93:44-52.  Abstract
  • Schwartz, TH; Haglund, MM; Lettich, E; Ojemann, GA. Asymmetry of neuronal activity during extracellular microelectrode recording from left and right human temporal lobe neocortex during rhyming and line-matching. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 2000;12:803-812.  Abstract
  • Macknik, SL; Haglund, MM. Optical images of visible and invisible percepts in the primary visual cortex of primates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA. 1999;96:15208-15210.  Abstract